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That means getting both the investment and the exits at the right price. Without the exit returns, they don’t achieve their bonuses and they don’t have the opportunity to raise a new fund. Mature VC firms which have been actively involved in funding emerging companies for a number of years have discovered just how hard it is to cope 37 An Introduction to angel investing Chapter Three: Sources of Private Equity with innovations, emerging markets and untried teams. Those VC firms typically have recruited senior staff who have technical (and often business) qualifications as well as a number of years of senior operational experience if not direct entrepreneurial success.

They typically invested 10-14% of their net worth in new ventures, although one quarter invested over 25% of their net worth. They were investing in about one third of proposals considered. Source: Kevin Hindle and Robert Wenban, 1999, Australia’s informal venture capitalist: an exploratory profile, Venture Capital, p199, Vol. 1. No. 2 The amount of net worth invested in private equity by Angels varies considerably and appears to be somewhat based on the total worth of the individual as well as their prior background.

The Angel plays the middle role: funding the business which has yet to stand on its own feet and not yet mature enough or with enough potential to attract venture capital. Angels typically invest in seed, start-up or early stage businesses. The Australian Bureau of Statistics’ 2001 Special Article – Venture Capital Survey uses a stage classification. The following definitions are used within that report to describe various stages at which a venture capital vehicle may make investments. • Seed: product is in development.

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