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By Donald L. Kreider, Robert G. Kuller, Donald R. Ostberg, Fred W. Perkins, Lynn H. LOoomis

An advent to Linear research

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Hop pellets break into small particles easily enough that they can be added freely to the boil or fermented when the recipes calls for them. Whole-leaf hops, however, can get pretty messy and block the flow of beer from the brewpot to the carboy or from the carboy to the bottling bucket. By packing the whole-leaf hops into a cheesecloth sack, they will be much easier to use, remove from the beer, and dispose of. It is important not to pack the sacks too tightly as the hops will expand when wet.

Store the bottled beer before drinking. Your bottled beer will need to be stored at room temperature (70–72˚F [21–22˚C]) for a couple weeks to give the yeast a chance to referment and carbonate the bottles. After two weeks, throw a few bottles in the fridge for your next party and put the remaining bottles in a cool, dark place for aging. Since this beer has a targeted alcohol content of 9 percent by volume, it will age well. Be sure to date and label the bottles if you plan to have multiple batches of homebrew in your inventory at any given time.

The pop-top option gives a much better seal to prevent flat-beer, oxidation, and potentially spoiled beer. Many craft breweries and homebrewers also package in 22-ounce (630-ml) “bomber” bottles or 750 ml Champagne bottles. They make for a more impressive presentation and are ideally sized for sharing with friends over a meal. More importantly, they hold roughly twice as much beer as a standard 12-ounce (355-ml) bottle, which means you’ll be cleaning, filling, and capping half as many bottles needed for a 5-gallon (19-L) batch.

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